Growing Up from Storage: When it’s Time to Move on

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man organizing garage sale

There’s no shame in  being a pack rat. In fact, if you’re anything like me you’re much more likely to let things stack up rather than sell them or give them away. While there’s no reason to be ashamed in collecting nice stuff and keeping great furniture or important possessions while you find yourself in a small apartment, but do you have storage because you have a lot of great things worth keeping for that larger apartment or house you’ll have someday, or because you’re holding on to too many things that it’s time to get rid of?

Keeping a storage unit around can often happen out of habit. Let’s face it: there are a lot of situations where having that extra space can come in extremely handy. However, there are also plenty of people who keep paying for storage out of habit when maybe it’s actually time to have a large garage sale and start over.

But how do you know when you’re going over this line?

There are a few specific things to look for when figuring out whether you should really keep going with storage or whether it’s time to have a sale and really re-evaluate where you’re standing at. This is especially true of individuals who have been paying for storage for years.

The first thing you want to do is take a day where you have some free time and go out to your storage unit and take a fresh look at what you have stored.

First of all, look at the furniture and other larger pieces. Is that couch you’ve been storing for years really the one you’d want for a new house, or would you likely go for buying something new? Are you keeping the couch because you need it, or because that’s just what you had at the time?

Look at furniture like recliners, tables, and the like. It makes sense that end tables and coffee tables can work for year after year, but if you have cheap tables and furniture like that you picked up during the college years chances are you went for cheap and effective. Is that really the level of furniture you want now, or would you honestly start over if all was said and done?

Keep in mind that if you’re paying for months or years of storage that you’re paying to keep that old furniture, those old clothes, and a variety of other items. When you think about it, you’re paying more and more for each of those items. If you don’t really like that furniture anymore or are just keeping it out of habit, why not sell them and see what’s left?

You might find you need less storage than you thought, or may even find everything that is truly important to you can be fit into a spare closet or couple of closets once you get rid of the rest of it.

Take the time to check out your storage unit and look at it with fresh eyes instead of thinking of all that stuff as what you’ve invested years into – you might find yourself less stressed, happier, and with more money when it’s all said and done.

Shane

Shane

Shane knows a thing or ten about moving. Since taking off for college at 17 he has moved over 50 times to more than a dozen states, including the Last Frontier of Alaska. During that time he's figured out the ins and outs of quality inexpensive storage, the importance of careful planning, and how to carefully ship even the most delicate items. He also enjoyed helping with packing, moving, and shipping of antiques for his parents' antique store. When he isn't sharing storage and moving advice, he's working on his next novel and, perhaps not surprisingly, eyeing his next move.
Shane

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About Shane

Shane knows a thing or ten about moving. Since taking off for college at 17 he has moved over 50 times to more than a dozen states, including the Last Frontier of Alaska. During that time he's figured out the ins and outs of quality inexpensive storage, the importance of careful planning, and how to carefully ship even the most delicate items. He also enjoyed helping with packing, moving, and shipping of antiques for his parents' antique store. When he isn't sharing storage and moving advice, he's working on his next novel and, perhaps not surprisingly, eyeing his next move.