Packing Tips: Never Pack Your Quilts Together!

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Stack of quilts

Sorry guys – going to have to split you up for another move…

Packing can be a hectic time, no matter how much time you give yourself, and no matter how much you try to be prepared. Some things pack easily: boxes of books you refuse to get rid of (good for you), large electronics, and clothes. Oh so many clothes. However, the hardest part always comes to packing fragile items. Do you have a light vase that you can’t imagine breaking during a move? Dishes that mean a lot to you?

Personally, I’m a sucker for great thin pottery and decorative glass work…which aren’t exactly known for being sturdy during a rough move. There’s only so much you can bubble wrap – so what can you do?

One thing I’ve learned from years of moving is that sometimes the best advice can often have two common attributes:

  1. It goes against the common knowledge or accepted way of doing things
  2. After finding a better way of doing things, it’s often so obvious you can’t believe more people haven’t thought of it

This post isn’t any different – though I’m going to save myself the embarrassment of letting you know how long it took me to figure out this particular tip. While you still want loose pages to magazines, newspapers, and still some bubble wrap, there’s one common thing most people have that they drastically overlook as a possible shipping help: excess bedding, especially quilts.

Why you should never pack your quilts together

The automatic instinct seems to be to pack all the blankets and bedding in one box and then crack a joke about that being the easy box for someone to carry. Why? If you don’t have delicate things to move then maybe this tip isn’t for you. But if you’re always worried/frustrated about packing possessions you don’t want broken, a thick quilt can be the perfect base.

First of all, in this case the fluffier the quilt, the better. I”m also of the opinion that plastic containers work better, but barring that try to find a box that is more rectangular and not a giant box, but one that a quilt can work as a solid lining to.

The first step is to put down the quilt like a lining. This should make every wall of the box/crate covered by a fluffy quilt, as well as the entire bottom. Ideally, you want enough so about one quarter of the quilt (more is fine) is completely outside the box. At this point, you want it “spilling out.”

Step two: The next step is to still individually wrap your dishes, glass pieces, pottery, or other delicate possessions, the way you normally would. I like individual magazine or newspaper pages in between individual plates, and then bubble wrapping the whole stack, if possible. Place each wrapped item carefully into the quilt lined bottom of the container.

Step three: Once packed, you can add extra protection simply by taking the excess quilt spilling out the top and packing it in. Don’t just cover your stuff – you can carefully pack the top of the quilt to “snuggle” it around each of the carefully packed items, putting soft quilt in between each item to minimize movement and maximize the padding.

Your quilts might be split up now – but your delicate items have never been so softly secured!

Shane

Shane

Shane knows a thing or ten about moving. Since taking off for college at 17 he has moved over 50 times to more than a dozen states, including the Last Frontier of Alaska. During that time he's figured out the ins and outs of quality inexpensive storage, the importance of careful planning, and how to carefully ship even the most delicate items. He also enjoyed helping with packing, moving, and shipping of antiques for his parents' antique store. When he isn't sharing storage and moving advice, he's working on his next novel and, perhaps not surprisingly, eyeing his next move.
Shane

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About Shane

Shane knows a thing or ten about moving. Since taking off for college at 17 he has moved over 50 times to more than a dozen states, including the Last Frontier of Alaska. During that time he's figured out the ins and outs of quality inexpensive storage, the importance of careful planning, and how to carefully ship even the most delicate items. He also enjoyed helping with packing, moving, and shipping of antiques for his parents' antique store. When he isn't sharing storage and moving advice, he's working on his next novel and, perhaps not surprisingly, eyeing his next move.